Six New Artists!

 

Sorrel Sky Gallery is excited to be representing several new artists: Painters David Frederick Riley and Lyn Boyer, and Native American ceramic artist Randy Chitto will show in Durango. Native American ceramic artist Alexis Adams, and jewelers Loren Nicole and Luísa Rosas will show in Santa Fe.


"The individuality of these six artists, the inspirations and journeys they have each experienced, will surely enhance the gallery's unique approach to creating connections between art and art lovers."
- Shanan Campbell Wells


David Frederick Riley works primarily in oil, contrasting contemporary color fields and abstract space, showcasing his subject’s emotion and the vibrancy of life. Inspired by the universal narratives and elements that appear in Nature, his work frequently illustrates themes of emotional and spiritual growth. “A lot of my work is about trying to balance opposing forces. Traditional subject matter presented in a modern way …balancing realism with abstraction.”


Lyn Boyer, an award-winning plein air and studio oil painter, carries on the great tradition of representational oil paintings that formed part of her early inspiration. She takes the focus, energy, and ability to respond in the moment required of plein air painting, and uses it to inform and bring life to her studio work. “I paint because it’s necessary. I remember every minute of a day spent painting. It tunes the senses and the soul.”


Randy Chitto showed an artistic talent from an early age. Since graduating from IAIA he has worked as a clay artist. His primary subject is the turtle, as they are considered the Choctaw story keepers and storytellers. The turtle keeps narratives shielded and protected under its shell until it is ready to share them. “Turtles are our story keepers. As long as our stories and songs are in them, we might dry up, but we’ll still be there.”


Alexis Adams chooses clay as a medium because of its limitless possibilities and prefers hand construction for the intimate relationship it fosters between her and her work. Her ceramic designs and creative abilities originate from the powerful influences of her family. “Though my Cheyenne ancestors were not known for making pottery, pottery as a symbol and result of Native American tradition spoke to me to the extent that I had to find a way to create my own.”


Loren Nicole began her career in archaeology. What began as a curiosity to better understand objects of the past, developed into a passion that eclipsed her academic interests. Her designs evoke the wonders of the ancient world, honoring ancient goldsmiths; while working exclusively in high karat yellow gold to inject a feeling of warmth and brightness. “Creating and exploring the works of other civilizations became a passion I couldn’t ignore.”


Luísa Rosas proximity to the jewelry world and the tools used by master goldsmiths infused her creative spirit. Her designs are the most recent manifestation of David Rosas creative vitality, a Portuguese house with a tradition laid by five generations dedicated to the creation of exclusive, original and timeless high jewelry pieces. “My work is the result of infinite simplifications, refinements, and interpretation of Nature’s elements.”


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